As always, YOUR BLACK META is bringing you staple Music, Meta, and Mindful; talking local news and upcoming events; and sharing opportunities for engaging with and supporting local communities!

Our INTERVIEW for this episode is MR. FIYAH and JENNY BOOTZ, of FIYAH MAGAZINE!

We're bringing you more about MONEY, including why we need it and the definitions for laundering it! Not to mention so many of the deeper motives behind capital and the hoarding of it, and some ideas about reasonable substitutes for the one thing it seems nobody, pauper or king, ever has enough of.

And we're closing our critical examination of the history and particulars of the United States Constitution, its Bill of Rights, and the successive Amendments. We're going out with a BANG, after touching with especial care on the First, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution! Starting with the take of a very different sort of professor than the Brothers Green. But a wise and insightful one, nonetheless. And we're going to end with yet another! Plus, be sure to scroll-down and check out "BLACKGIRLMAGIC," for an amazing example of the subject!

--Your Black Meta!

 

 

 


 

 

 

THE INTERVIEW: MR. FIYAH and JENNYBOOTZ of FIYAHMAGAZINE!

 

From 2015 Fiyah Rah was put in position as president of Fiyah Magazine New York branch, from his brothers, Vegas Miller CEO of Fiyah Magazine & Coo Raheem Shepard, wanting to expand the company of Fiyah Magazine... headquarters based in Columbus, Ohio established 2012, with branches Fiyah Atlanta, Fiyah Cali & Fiyah New York,this magazine is a Hip-Hop culture-based magazine for local talent everywhere, full of local models, Hip-Hop and R&B  artist, businesses, local events, artist spotlight etc.

Since Fiyah Rah a.k.a. Mr. Fiyah NY became a part of this Fiyah Magazine movement in 2015, he has worked with celebrity artist such as Noreaga, Fred the Godson, Juelz Santana, and local artist Meeks Major, Eaze the Rapper, Siah the King. He is also the C EO and creator of his own clothing company called "Fiyah New York Clothing," which is women's, men's, and children's clothing, customized to the next level, and different types of merchandise like dad hats, cups, towels, pillows, and back packs. We are also launching FiyahNyTv in July 2019, going to local businesses, shining the light visually for, awesome diverse cultures and eats, bringing attention to their businesses on urban platforms such as Facebook and Instagram Live as well as our YouTube channel. We are so excited and thankful to be welcomed by the Radio Kingston Family! We are here to bring awareness of all the local on goings/events in our community, in Kingston, NY. United we stand!

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24068" align="aligncenter" width="622"] Price package. Photo courtesy of FIYAH MAGAZINE. http://www.fiyahmagazine.net/[/caption]

 

 

 

[caption id="attachment_24213" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Mr. FiyahNY and Jenny Bootz. http://www.fiyahmagazine.net/ Photo by beetle.[/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24214" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Mr. FiyahNY and Jenny Bootz, holding a framed cover of Fiyah Magazine. http://www.fiyahmagazine.net/ Photo by beetle. [/caption]

 

[caption id="attachment_24215" align="aligncenter" width="768"] The late Nipsey Hustle on the cover of Fiyah Magazine. http://www.fiyahmagazine.net/ Photo by beetle.[/caption]

 

 

 

Social Media

 

  • Website: Fiyahmagazine.net
  • Instagram: @fiyahnyrah @mr.fiyahny & jennybootz_fiyahny
  • Contact: Fiyahny@gmail.com

 

 

 

Upcoming!!!

 

 

  • What: FiyahNY Magazine Release Party, plus FREE DOWNLOADS of the magazine for 24 hours!
  • performing artists TBA from the local hip-hop community, as well as the empire-builder, himself, Mr. Fiyah, and the fun and awesome Jenny Bootz!
  • When: June 28th, 10pm
  • Where: 302 Lounge, Poughkeepsie, NY

 

 

More info upcoming!

 

 


 

 

Support Our Community AND BE INFORMED

 

Community organizations to connect, to listen, and to be heard:
https://citizenactionny.org/about
https://citizenactionny.org/events/venues/7-grand-st-kingston-ny-12401-usa
https://kingstontenantsunion.org/
https://kingstontenantsunion.org/events/
https://kingstontenantsunion.org/news/
https://riseupkingston.org/
https://riseupkingston.org/blog
Upcoming Demonstrations
Your Meta will keep you updated about upcoming opportunities to speak up and speak out. 

 

 


 

FreedomWalker's Sources and Credits

COFFEE & GREEN TEA COMBO

 

  • Why do we need money to survive in today's busy world? … www.quora.com/Why-do-we-need-money-to-survive-in-todays-busy-world

 

 

 

THE SPRUCE

 

  • Thespruce.com
K-TOWN NEWS

 

  • Almanac Weekly
MINDFUL MUSEUM

 

  • Nisw.uk.org - Money
  • Money Laundering Definition - Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/moneylaundering.asp May 03, 2019 · Money laundering is the process of creating the appearance that large amounts of money obtained from criminal activity, such as drug trafficking or terrorist activity, originated from a legitimate source. The money from the illicit activity is considered dirty, and the process "launders" the money to make it look … Cams · AML · USA Patriot Act
  • Legaldictionary.net- " Money Laundering

 

 

 


 

 

beetle's Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links

THE AMENDMENTS DU JOUR
  1. First Amendment: The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prevents the government from making laws which respect an establishment of religion, prohibit the free exercise of religion, or abridge the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or the right to petition the government for redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was originally proposed to assuage Anti-Federalist opposition to Constitutional ratification. Initially, the First Amendment applied only to laws enacted by the Congress, and many of its provisions were interpreted more narrowly than they are today. Beginning with Gitlow v. New York (1925), the Supreme Court applied the First Amendment to states—a process known as incorporation—through the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In Everson v. Board of Education (1947), the Court drew on Thomas Jefferson's correspondence to call for "a wall of separation between church and State", though the precise boundary of this separation remains in dispute. Speech rights were expanded significantly in a series of 20th and 21st-century court decisions which protected various forms of political speech, anonymous speech, campaign financing, pornography, and school speech; these rulings also defined a series of exceptions to First Amendment protections. The Supreme Court overturned English common law precedent to increase the burden of proof for defamation and libel suits, most notably in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (1964). Commercial speech, however, is less protected by the First Amendment than political speech, and is therefore subject to greater regulation. The Free Press Clause protects publication of information and opinions, and applies to a wide variety of media. In Near v. Minnesota (1931) and New York Times v. United States (1971), the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment protected against prior restraint—pre-publication censorship—in almost all cases. The Petition Clause protects the right to petition all branches and agencies of government for action. In addition to the right of assembly guaranteed by this clause, the Court has also ruled that the amendment implicitly protects freedom of association. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  2. The Fourteenth Amendment: (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments. Arguably one of the most consequential amendments to this day, the amendment addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws and was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves following the American Civil War. The amendment was bitterly contested, particularly by the states of the defeated Confederacy, which were forced to ratify it in order to regain representation in Congress. The amendment, particularly its first section, is one of the most litigated parts of the Constitution, forming the basis for landmark decisions such as Brown v. Board of Education (1954) regarding racial segregation, Roe v. Wade (1973) regarding abortion, Bush v. Gore (2000) regarding the 2000 presidential election, and Obergefell v. Hodges (2015) regarding same-sex marriage. The amendment limits the actions of all state and local officials, including those acting on behalf of such an official. The amendment's first section includes several clauses: the Citizenship Clause, Privileges or Immunities Clause, Due Process Clause, and Equal Protection Clause. The Citizenship Clause provides a broad definition of citizenship, nullifying the Supreme Court's decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857), which had held that Americans descended from African slaves could not be citizens of the United States. Since the Slaughter-House Cases (1873), the Privileges or Immunities Clause has been interpreted to do very little. The Due Process Clause prohibits state and local governments from depriving persons of life, liberty, or property without a fair procedure. The Supreme Court has ruled this clause makes most of the Bill of Rights as applicable to the states as it is to the federal government, as well as to recognize substantive and procedural requirements that state laws must satisfy. The Equal Protection Clause requires each state to provide equal protection under the law to all people, including all non-citizens, within its jurisdiction. This clause has been the basis for many decisions rejecting irrational or unnecessary discrimination against people belonging to various groups. The second, third, and fourth sections of the amendment are seldom litigated. However, the second section's reference to "rebellion, or other crime" has been invoked as a constitutional ground for felony disenfranchisement. The fourth section was held, in Perry v. United States (1935), to prohibit a current Congress from abrogating a contract of debt incurred by a prior Congress. The fifth section gives Congress the power to enforce the amendment's provisions by "appropriate legislation"; however, under City of Boerne v. Flores (1997), this power may not be used to contradict a Supreme Court decision interpreting the amendment. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
THE RECONSTRUCTION AMENDMENTS
The Reconstruction Amendments are the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments to the United States Constitution, adopted between 1865 and 1870, the five years immediately following the Civil War. The last time the Constitution had been amended was with the Twelfth Amendment more than 60 years earlier in 1804. The Reconstruction amendments were important in implementing the Reconstruction of the American South after the war. Their proponents saw them as transforming the United States from a country that was (in Abraham Lincoln's words) "half slave and half free" to one in which the constitutionally guaranteed "blessings of liberty" would be extended to the entire populace, including the former slaves and their descendants. . . . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Amendments
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
A (SUPREME COURT) CASE OF DENIED IDENTITY

Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. (19 How.) 393 (1857), was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court held that the U.S. Constitution was not meant to include American citizenship for black people, regardless of whether they were enslaved or free, and therefore the rights and privileges it confers upon American citizens could never apply to them.[2][3] The plaintiff in the case was Dred Scott, an enslaved black man whose owners had taken him from Missouri, which was a slave-holding state, into the Missouri Territory, most of which had been designated "free" territory by the Missouri Compromise of 1820. When his owners later brought him back to Missouri, Scott sued in court for his freedom, claiming that because he had been taken into "free" U.S. territory, he had automatically been freed, and was legally no longer a slave. Scott sued first in Missouri state court, which ruled that he was still a slave under its law. He then sued in U.S. federal court, which ruled against him by deciding that it had to apply Missouri law to the case. He then appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In March 1857, the Supreme Court issued a 7–2 decision against Dred Scott. In an opinion written by Chief Justice Roger Taney, the Court ruled that black people "are not included, and were not intended to be included, under the word 'citizens' in the Constitution, and can therefore claim none of the rights and privileges which that instrument provides for and secures to citizens of the United States." Taney supported his ruling with an extended survey of American state and local laws from the time of the Constitution's drafting in 1787 purporting to show that a "perpetual and impassable barrier was intended to be erected between the white race and the one which they had reduced to slavery." Because the Court ruled that Scott was not an American citizen, any federal lawsuit he filed automatically failed because he could never establish the "diversity of citizenship" that Article III of the U.S. Constitution requires for an American federal court to be able to exercise jurisdiction over a case.[2] After ruling on these issues surrounding Scott, Taney continued further and struck down the entire Missouri Compromise as a limitation on slavery that exceeded the U.S. Congress's powers under the Constitution. Two justices—John McLean and Benjamin Robbins Curtis—dissented from the Court's opinion, writing that the majority's historical survey was inaccurate and that legal precedent showed that some black people actually had been citizens at the time of the Constitution's creation, and also that the majority's opinion went too far in striking down the Missouri Compromise.

Although Chief Justice Taney and several of the other justices hoped that the ruling would settle the slavery controversy—which was increasingly dividing the American public—its effect was almost the complete opposite.[4] Taney's majority opinion "was greeted with unmitigated wrath from every segment of the United States except the slave holding states."[3] Rather than settling the controversy, the decision actually proved to be a contributing factor in the outbreak of the American Civil War four years later in 1861. After the Union's victory in 1865, the Court's rulings in Dred Scott were superseded by direct amendments to the U.S. Constitution, particularly by the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolished slavery, and by the first clause of Section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment, which reads: "All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside."

The Supreme Court's decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford is largely denounced by modern scholars. Many contemporary lawyers, and most modern legal scholars, consider the ruling regarding slavery in the territories to be obiter dictum and not a binding precedent. Bernard Schwartz says it "stands first in any list of the worst Supreme Court decisions—Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes called it the Court's greatest self-inflicted wound."[5] Junius P. Rodriguez says it is "universally condemned as the U.S. Supreme Court's worst decision."[6] Historian David Thomas Konig says it was "unquestionably, our court's worst decision ever." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dred_Scott_v._Sandford

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_constitutional_law
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convention_to_propose_amendments_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exclusionary_rule
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_of_the_poisonous_tree
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_amendments_to_the_United_States_Constitution#Ratified_amendments
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_amendments_to_the_United_States_Constitution#Unratified_amendments
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_proposed_amendments_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_law
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unenumerated_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Constitution

 

SPOTLIGHT: Knowing Your History Means Knowing Your History

 

 

Multimedia

 

 

  1. "Slave Patrols-The Father Of Modern Day Police." Africa Diaspora News Channel, Youtube. August 7, 2016. [14:30] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRDUok20B6k [Worth it, also, for the comments-section.--beetle]
  2. "Slave Patrols: The Birth of the Modern Police." Stimulator, Youtube. October 4, 2017. [2:47] Given contemporary police officers' role as the enforcers of white supremacist terror in Black communities in the United States, it should not be surprising that they trace their origins to an earlier institution of racist social control – namely, slave patrols. Watch the rest of this episode at https://sub.media/trouble Support our work! https://sub.media/donate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMsCXnH4ePA [Couldn’t find the full video on the website.--beetle]
  3. "Driving While Black in New Jersey." VICE News, Youtube. April 11, 2016. [16:09] A new report from Seton Hall Law School Center for Policy & Research has found that in the majority-white municipality of Bloomfield, New Jersey, nearly 80 percent of traffic tickets are issued to African American and Latino drivers. The report also found that most tickets were issued to non-resident minority drivers passing through town, suggesting a "de facto border patrol" policing policy is in effect. The Bloomfield Police Department — which has begun collecting data on the race of drivers in traffic stops as of January 2016 — rejects the report's findings. VICE News reports on Seton Hall's methodology and on the experience of minority drivers in Bloomfield. Please note that in this video, Lakisha Finkelstein's name was misspelled as Latisha Finkelstein. Read the report, "Racial Profiling Report: Bloomfield Police and Bloomfield Municipal Court” - http://bit.ly/20vowHc Read "NYPD Cops Who Arrested Black Mailman Have History of Alleged Civil Rights Violations” - http://bit.ly/1S144IG . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjXWjtkrFUk
  4. "Sheriff On Killing Suspect: "I Love This Sh*t" (VIDEO)." The Young Turks, Youtube. February 7, 2018. [10:45] Sheriff Oddie Shoupe didn’t know that the body cam was still recording him. Ana Kasparian, Mark Thompson, Maytha Alhassen, the hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. “A Tennessee sheriff is being sued for using excessive force after he was recorded boasting he had told officers to shoot a man rather than risk damaging police cars by ramming him off the road. “They said ‘we’re ramming him,’” Sheriff Oddie Shoupe of White County said on tape in the aftermath of the killing of suspect Michael Dial. “I said, ‘Don’t ram him, shoot him.’ Fuck that shit. Ain’t gonna tear up my cars.” Shoupe arrived on the scene shortly after police had shot Dial at the conclusion of a low-speed chase, clearly upset he had missed the excitement. “I love this shit,” Shoupe said, apparently unaware that his comments were being picked up by another deputy’s body-worn camera. “God, I tell you what, I thrive on it. “If they don’t think I’ll give the damn order to kill that motherfucker they’re full of shit,” he added, laughing. “Take him out. I’m here on the damn wrong end of the county,” he said. Shoupe’s comments have prompted a federal lawsuit from Dial’s widow, Robyn Dial, alleging the use of excessive force against her late husband, who was unarmed.” Hosts: Ana Kasparian, Mark Thompson, Maytha Alhassen.
  5. "Social Media Exposes Disturbing Side Of Police Culture." The Damage Report, Youtube. June 5, 2019. [7:31] A study of police officer's social media posts reveals a very troubling trend. Brett Erlich, Jayar Jackson, and Emily Baker-White break it down on The Damage Report. "Philadelphia authorities are investigating claims of racial bias levied by the Plain View Project, a social justice research organization that claims to have uncovered more than 300 racist and/or biased social media posts by the city's police officers. Researchers with the Plain View Project said they examined more than 3,100 posts and comments on Facebook allegedly authored by current and retired officers of the Philadelphia Police Department. The analysis revealed that at least 328 active-duty officers posted troubling content, including posts that celebrated acts of violence against Muslims, immigrants and black people accused of committing crimes. Some posts captured long, hate-filled exchanges that ap
  6. "How systemic racism entangles all police officers — even black cops." German Lopez, Vox.com. August 15, 2016. [1:48] Neill Franklin is a black man. But he'll admit that after decades of working at the Baltimore Police Department and Maryland State Police, he harbored a strong bias against young black men. Franklin, executive director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, which opposes the war on drugs, previously explained, "When I'd see a young black male in a particular neighborhood, or his pants were sagging a little bit, or he walked a certain way … my first thoughts were, 'Oh, I wonder if he's selling drugs.'" https://www.vox.com/2015/5/7/8562077/police-racism-implicit-bias
  7. "Ava DuVernay: Trump's rhetoric responsible for 1994 crime bill." CNN, Youtube. June 3, 2019. [10:58] Ava DuVernay, creator of the Netflix series "When They See Us" on the Central Park Five, spoke to CNN's Christiane Amanpour about how Trump's rhetoric over the case was directly responsible for the atmosphere that made the 1994 crime bill possible to pass. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZZKhX0lXyY
  8. "Struggle by 'Central Park 5' ends in $40 million settlement." PBS NewsHour, Youtube. June 20, 2014. [7:33] New York City will pay $40 million to five black and Latino men who 25 years ago were wrongly convicted of raping and beating a woman in Central Park. Their conviction was vacated in 2002, but it took until now to close the book on the decade-long civil rights lawsuit. Jeffrey Brown talks to Craig Steven Wilder of Massachusetts Institute of Technology for more on the legacy of the infamous crime. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KIp2niyFNQ
  9. "Justice For The Central Park 5." The Damage Report, Youtube. June 3, 2019. [7:23] 'When They See Us' gives the Central Park 5 the humanity they were originally denied. Brooke Thomas and David Dennis Jr. break it down on The Damage Report. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=War2yVZc6I0
  10. "Survivors Of The Real ‘Central Park Five’ Attacker Speak." The Damage Report, Youtube. June 4, 2019. [9:29] What could’ve been prevented had the real attacker been arrested and charged? Brooke Thomas and Aida Rodriguez break it down on The Damage Report. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aILuwO-S0jU
  11. "Trump Still Thinks 'Central Park Five' Are Guilty | All In | MSNBC." MSNBC, Youtube. October 7, 2016. [6:43] Chris Hayes talks with one of the men wrongfully convicted in the Central Park jogger case, Yusef Salaam, about Donald Trump and his latest comments. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67pQmshOOvA
  12. "TYT Staffer Tells Personal Police Harassment Story." The Young Turks, Youtube. May 7, 2019. [25:53] TYT staff member Jacorey Palmer talks about a horrific police encounter he had. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xk1wBrmFo_w
  13. "Open Carry Laws Aren’t For Black People." The Young Turks, Youtube. December 29, 2015. [9:17] Yesterday a grand jury refused to indict the police officer involved in the killing of Tamir Rice, because the prosecutor threw the case to help his political career. But Ohio is an open carry state… Cenk Uygur, host of the The Young Turks, breaks it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. "Last year, police officers in Ohio shot and killed John Crawford in a Walmart in Beavercreek, and, in a separate shooting, 12-year-old Tamir Rice outside of a Cleveland recreation center, largely on the belief that Crawford and Rice were carrying real guns. Grand juries have now backed up the officers, deciding to file no criminal charges against the cops involved in the two police shootings. Crawford and Rice were carrying toy weapons, but the killings have sparked questions about why police were allowed to shoot two people for holding what appeared to be actual guns in a state where it is legal to openly carry them. But legal experts say that open carry laws and the laws that govern police use of force don't really have much to do with each other. Here's why... However, the open carry laws have little to do with whether a police shooting is justified, experts say. As attorney and gun rights advocate David Kopel explained, police officers wouldn't be allowed to shoot someone just because he's wielding a gun where open carry is a legal. Under the two Supreme Court decisions — Tennessee vs. Garner and Graham v. Connor — that dictate police use of force, officers must show that they had an objectively reasonable belief that a suspect was a threat up to the moment the last bullet was fired. ”* https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FneVxGLF1zU
  14. "White Vs. Black Open Carry Social Experiment Expose Racism With Police." African Diaspora New Channel, Youtube. May 20, 2015. [9:59] A recent social experiment was done to see how police would react to a white and black man carrying a AR-15. The police response just prove how we aren't treated equal in this country. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jf5TEoo-EY0
  15. ‘“Permit Patty” Calls the Cops on an Eight-Year-Old Girl | The Daily Show.’ The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, Youtube. June 26, 2018. [5:06] Dulce Sloan weighs in on the controversy surrounding a white woman who called the police on an eight-year-old black girl for selling bottled water without a permit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnTZuGKhwSU
  16. "“Cornerstore Caroline” Falsely Accuses a 9-Year-Old Black Boy of Sexual Assault | The Daily Show." The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, Youtube. October 15, 2018. [4:51] In this week’s edition of white people calling the cops on innocent black people: A woman has earned the nickname “Cornerstone Caroline” for accusing a 9-year-old boy of sexual assault after his backpack brushed up against her in a Brooklyn deli. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYep3LwjjW4
  17. "11-year-old girl wrongfully handcuffed by police in front of mother and aunt." ABC News, Youtube. December 13, 2017. [1:40] Grand Rapids, Michigan, police launch an internal investigation, saying Honestie Hodges should not have been treated like an adult. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mqw4itSwO7Q
  18. "Cops called on black student eating lunch at Smith College." CBS News, Youtube. August 3, 2018. [2:04] The president of Smith College apologized for the "painful incident" after a student posted video of herself being questioned by officers in a school dining hall. Christina Hager of CBS Boston station WBZ reports. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbPzsREhrUA
  19. "Cops called to apartment for `burglary in progress` find black tenant moving into unit." PIX11 News, Youtube. April 30, 2018. [2:30] He`s a Bronx native who spent the last few years working in the White House. He was moving back to New York when police were called on him. Neighbors reported it as a burglary in progress. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLXh85Nc1Bk
  20. "Dog Park Diane Calls Cops On Black Attorney And His Dog." SEIJI HITO, Youtube. March 2, 2019. [14:34] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inGoXreFI3c
  21. "Police mistake black teen riding with white grandmother for robbery suspect." CBS Evening News, Youtube. September 8, 2018. [2:03] Police in Wisconsin say they mistook an African-American teenager for a robbery suspect and handcuffed him. Police called it a big misunderstanding. Michelle Miller reports. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPubUIKLzsM
  22. "Black Man Arrested For SITTING IN HIS OWN CAR?!." What's Trending, Youtube. August 28, 2018. [3:14] 21-year-old Jaquon Dean was approached by a security guard who asked for his ID. Dean refused to give it, since he was sitting in his car at the apartment complex where he lives, doing nothing wrong. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1hboBE4D6Q
  23. "Attorney: White women repeatedly called police on client for 'Gardening while black' in Detroit." WXYZ-TV Detroit | Channel 7. Youtube. October 19, 2018. [2:37] "They, strictly, thought their so-called white privilege was gonna work this time and it didn't," said Marc Peeples who was acquitted in a directed verdict in a case where three women, who are white, accused Peeples, who is black, of stalking them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1lU6vfhi4Q
  24. "Paul Butler: Profiled on My Own Street." Atlanticphil, Youtube. June 8, 2011. [8:59] In May 2011, The Atlantic Philanthropies and The New Press (http://thenewpress.com/) hosted a discussion about racial profiling in the United States. Racial profiling stigmatises and criminalises people of colour from as early as their pre-teens, violates the rights and civil liberties of innocent people, and has devastating consequences on entire communities. The fascinating panel included former litigator and law professor Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow, and former federal prosecutor and law professor Paul Butler, author of Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice. Kent Hutchinson and Justin Coello, two young men who have been racially profiled in their neighbourhoods, also gave firsthand accounts of their experiences. In this video excerpt, Paul Butler talks about being racially profiled in his neighbourhood and on his front porch. You can read more about the event or watch the full discussion here: http://www.atlanticphilanthropies.org... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pl7cT-O_b0E
  25. "Bodycam video shows arrest of innocent NBA player Sterling Brown." CBS Evening News, Youtube. May 23, 2018. [1:44] Police in Milwaukee released bodycam video of an altercation officers had with a member of the Milwaukee Bucks basketball team. The city’s mayor apologized ahead of the release. DeMarco Morgan reports. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21X0rfd7QUA
  26. "Officer Pulls Gun on Student Picking Up Trash Outside of Dorm Building | NowThis." NowThisNews, Youtube. ay 30, 2019. [8:13] This cop pulled his gun on a student who was picking up trash in front of his dorm. Zayd Atkinson, a student at Naropa University, was confronted by an officer while picking up trash for his work-study job outside of his dorm. The officer did not have reasonable suspicion that a crime was occurring and was not entitled to demand Atkinson's date of birth, according to an independent review by a former U.S. Attorney. Research shows Black people are often exposed to heightened scrutiny and suspicion, which can begin early in childhood. 54% of Black Americans say they felt others 'have been suspicious of them because of the color of their skin,' compared to 6% of white Americans. Several officers, some with guns drawn, surrounded Atkinson. A college faculty member later appeared to back up Atkinson. The police officers never asked the faculty member, a white man, to confirm his identity or prove that he worked for the college. After almost 15 minutes, the officer gave Atkinson back his ID and left. The officer resigned two weeks after the incident but will remain on the city payroll until February 2020. An internal investigation found the officer violated 2 department policies but did not conclude he was racially biased. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9SZlypyK-4
  27. "Black man confronted by cops at home still in fear." ABC News, Youtube. April 5, 2019. [3:04] Zayd Atkinson, 26, told ABC News he's still fighting to overcome the "traumatic experience" of being racially profiled by Colorado police officers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qS8BamRX9w
  28. "Backlash After Black Columbia Student Pinned by Security | NBC New York." NBC New York, Youtube. April 15, 2019. [2:23] A black Columbia University senior went to get some free food in the Barnard Milstein Center late Thursday night when he was pinned down by campus security, asked to leave the building repeatedly, and had his ID confiscated, video shows. Now six Barnard Public Safety officers have been put on administrative leave pending an investigation. Alexander McNab kept walking when he was asked to show his ID at the front gate of the building. It is Columbia policy that students must show ID to enter buildings after 11 p.m., but according to Barnard junior Caroline Cutlip, who filmed the incident, the rule that students must show their IDs at the gate is a “casually enforced” one that “many students do not follow.” In an interview with Columbia’s student newspaper the Columbia Spectator, McNab said he was aware of this rule, but was frustrated because he saw inconsistent enforcement between white students and students of color. This time when they asked him to see it, he paid it no attention. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIi-HQU0j1M
  29. "Detroit man found guilty after shooting at black teen who knocked on his door." CBS This Morning, Youtube. October 13, 2018. [2:32] Last April, in suburban Detroit, a teenager got lost on his way to school and knocked on a door to ask for directions. The homeowner, Jeffrey Ziegler, opened the door armed with a shotgun and fired at the teen as he ran for his life. On Friday, a jury found Ziegler guilty of assault. Dean Reynolds reports. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys9sKztiK-s
  30. "Rochester Hills man gets 4-10 years in prison for shooting at black teenager." Click On Detroit | Local 4 | WDIV, Youtube. November 13, 2018. [3:01] A Rochester Hills man was sentenced to four to 10 years in prison for shooting at black teenager. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjk1Pohu2CA
  31. "FBI to Investigate Video of Female Student Body-Slammed by Cop | NBC Nightly News." NBC News, Youtube. October 27, 2015. [2:58] The FBI will open a civil rights investigation into why an officer violently threw a student to the ground in a South Carolina classroom, caught on video now gone viral. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3B6fB5iVwBE
  32. "Body cam: Detroit officer allegedly breaks woman's arm." Detroit Free Press, Youtube. April 27, 2019. [3:33] Video obtained by Fieger Law Firm shows an encounter, Elaine Murriel had with former Detroit officer Gary Steele, who allegedly broke her arm. Video from Detroit Police Department. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgarZRvxjMA
  33. "Virginia Cop Tasers Man Having Medical Emergency." ABC News, Youtube. May 23, 2015. [2:42] Officer’s body cam captured the incident. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oP1WToagUA
  34. "Cop Kills Teen Then Sues Family For $10 Million." The Young Turks, Youtube. February 8, 2016. [9:42] A Chicago cop who fatally shot a mentally ill teen back in December is now suing the dead teen’s family for $10 million claiming extreme emotional trauma. Officer Robert Rialmo killed Quintonio LeGrier as well as 55-year-old Bettie Jones. Cenk Uygur and Hannah Cranston hosts of The Young Turks discuss. Why on Earth would anyone sue in this situation? Let us know in the comments below. Read more here: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/natio... “A Chicago cop who fatally shot a mentally ill college student in December — as well as the teen’s unsuspecting neighbor — is now suing the dead teen’s family for $10 million, claiming the killings gave him “extreme emotional trauma.” Officer Robert Rialmo filed the staggering suit Friday over his contested killing of 19-year-old Quintonio LeGrier, a Northern Illinois University sophomore. The officer also accidentally killed Bettie Jones, 55, who was standing nearby, according to police. The slain student’s family immediately slammed the suit, which comes amid the exploding scandal over deadly, racially motivated police tactics in Chicago.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJ-PRXjaNNk
  35. "Kendrick Johnson's organs missing." CNN, Youtube. October 9, 2013. [5:24] The body of Kendrick Johnson came back to his parents with organs missing. CNN's Victor Blackwell reports. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzyMnWwWe0M
  36. "U.S. attorney opens Kendrick Johnson's case." CNN, Youtube. October 31, 2013. [4:10] Kendrick Johnson's family is grateful federal authorities will investigate the circumstances behind their son's death. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmI1ffcvz8I
  37. "Family: Death cover-up was a conspiracy." CNN, Youtube. October 31, 2013. [5:12] The family of of Georgia teen Kendrick Johnson say his death was a murder that was covered up to protect someone. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLP6xBqQWhc
  38. "Missing video in teen gym-mat death?" CNN, Youtube. November 21, 2013. [6:11] In a CNN exclusive, Victor Blackwell investigates the surveillance videos recorded around the time Kendrick Johnson died. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcRhhqpuV34
  39. "FBI digs deeper in Kendrick Johnson case." CNN, Youtube. January 10, 2014. [5:10] CNN's Victor Blackwell reports on law enforcement missteps in the Kendrick Johnson case and what the FBI is doing now. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tD-Yv1mQMXc
  40. "Was there a confession in gym mat death case?." HLN, Youtube. March 20, 2019. [3:52] Investigators in Lowndes County, Georgia, say they are looking into an anonymous tip that was e-mailed into the sheriff's department right around the time of the bizarre, 2013 death of Kendrick Johnson. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_smhW5jHpM
  41. "Kendrick Johnson was murdered! Jackie Johnson Speaks out." Lonnel Harris, Youtube. December 20, 2018. [15:44] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1uemChiGEI
  42. "What two men say happened when they were arrested at Philadelphia Starbucks." ABC News, Youtube. April 20, 2018. [6:46] Rashon Nelson and Donte Robinson, both 23-year-old entrepreneurs and longtime friends, said they were there for a business meeting they hoped would change their lives. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84MV_SLi9Vs
  43. "Video shows cops forcing pregnant woman on stomach." CNN, Youtube. May 28, 2015. [5:15] The ACLU recently released this footage of a police officer putting a pregnant woman on the ground. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpOOySpNtrc
  44. "Racist Chicago Cop Punches Pregnant Woman In Stomach For Laughing At Him." African Diaspora News Channel, Youtube. May 22, 2015. [6:12] A Chicago cop has been accused of punching a pregnant woman in the stomach, and it was reportedly caught on camera. And it's not only the punch, but what led up to it that shows the deep rift between some members of the African American community and police officers. The woman stated what sparked the punch was when she and others laughed at the officer after a suspected drug dealer was able to run from the cops and get away. But if punching a pregnant woman wasn't bad enough, the white officer then allegedly went on a racist tirade. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSYCg54TR40
  45. "Emantic Bradford Jr.’s Death & Why the Second Amendment Doesn’t Apply to Black Men | The Daily Show." The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, Youtube. November 27, 2018. [5:30] The shooting of Emantic “E.J.” Bradford Jr. once again proves that a black man can’t be “a good guy with a gun.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWwQjH7T1bE
  46. "Cops Beat Man Bloody Then Arrest Him For Bleeding On Them." The Young Turks, Youtube. August 15, 2014. [9:33] "Police in Ferguson, Missouri, once charged a man with destruction of property for bleeding on their uniforms while four of them allegedly beat him. “On and/or about the 20th day of Sept. 20, 2009 at or near 222 S. Florissant within the corporate limits of Ferguson, Missouri, the above named defendant did then and there unlawfully commit the offense of ‘property damage’ to wit did transfer blood to the uniform,” reads the charge sheet. The address is the headquarters of the Ferguson Police Department, where a 52-year-old welder named Henry Davis was taken in the predawn hours on that date. He had been arrested for an outstanding warrant that proved to actually be for another man of the same surname, but a different middle name and Social Security number." Read more here: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles... Ben Mankiewicz, Ana Kasparian, Cenk Uygur and Jimmy Dore of The Young Turks discuss this story. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-Yg6fWxdLE
  47. "Rapper Meek Mill on his new album, Kanye and criminal justice reform." CNN, Youtube. December 1, 2018. [11:08] Having served his third prison sentence, Meek Mill has a new number-one album and a mission: to reform the criminal justice system. [For Meek schooling the interviewer on the inside of so-called criminal justice, here's the link, cued to 05:55: https://youtu.be/fRm7cpDSKHI?t=355 --beetle] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRm7cpDSKHI
  48. "Meek Mill Schools CNN Host With Black American Reality." The Rational National, Youtube. December 4, 2018. [19:19] [Truth to power, with commentary from a white Canadian. --beetle] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWtX4u-gbEE "Meek Mill: Prisoners Need a New Set of Rights Like many who are now incarcerated, I was the victim of a miscarriage of justice. I got lucky, but because of dysfunctional, discriminatory rules, most don’t." Meek Mill, Nytimes.org. November 26, 2018.https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/26/opinion/meek-mill-criminal-justice-reform.html
  49. "Tomi Lahren's STUPID Response To Jesse Williams’ BET Award Speech About Racism." The Young Turks, Youtube. June 29, 2016. [14:09] During the BET awards Actor Jesse Williams spoke out against the racism that still exists in America, TheBlaze host Tomi Lahren responded on her program. Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian, hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlMoC9oz8Ac
  50. "Jesse Williams Full Speech at BET Awards 2016." Aaron Cadam Samuels, Youtube. July 4, 2016. [8:17] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbXmnUILMp0
  51. "Principal refused to let valedictorian give graduation speech." CBS News, July 5, 2018. [1:34] When Rochester, New York, teen Jaisaan Lovett graduated last month as his high school's first black valedictorian, he prepared a speech — but he says the principal wouldn't let him give it. Then the mayor stepped in and wanted to hear what he had to say. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ErRXUPjzAY

 

 

 

Resources & Articles

 

 

  1. "From the Slave Codes to Mike Brown: the brutal history of African Americans and law enforcement." Michael A. Robinson, Lse.ac.uk. October 05, 2017. Police killings of unarmed African American men have been highly publicized and heavily debated as a horrific social problem in recent years. Michael A. Robinson writes that this social ill can be traced back to the start of the slave trade. The relationship between police and Black men reflects how the white majority has perceived Black men throughout the history of America. https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/usappblog/2017/10/05/from-the-slave-codes-to-mike-brown-the-brutal-history-of-african-americans-and-law-enforcement/
  2. "Slavery and the Origins of the American Police State From the beginning, some Americans have been able to move more freely than others." Ben Fountain, Medium.com. September 17, 2018. https://medium.com/s/story/slavery-and-the-origins-of-the-american-police-state-ec318f5ff05b
  3. "A Brief History of Slavery and the Origins of American Policing." Victor E. Kappeler, Ph.D, Eku.edu. January 7, 2014. https://plsonline.eku.edu/insidelook/brief-history-slavery-and-origins-american-policing
  4. "How the U.S. Got Its Police Force." Olivia B. Waxman, Time.com. Updated May 17, 2017. time.com/4779112/police-history-origins/
  5. "Policing and Oppression Have a Long History The debate on racism and law enforcement follows a clear line back to the antebellum South." Stephen L. Carter, Bloomberg.com. October 29, 2015. https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2015-10-29/policing-and-oppression-have-a-long-history
  6. "NFL's Kaepernick Compares Cops to Fugitive Slave Patrols." Fox New Insider, Foxnews.com. June 18, 2017. https://insider.foxnews.com/2017/06/18/colin-kaepernick-police-fugitive-slave-patrols-philando-castile-verdict

 

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/40_Acres_%26_A_Mule
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abolitionism
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Johnson
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Four_of_the_United_States_Constitution#Clause_3:_Fugitive_Slave_Clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Two_of_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_impeachment
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Codes_(United_States)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_Democrats
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpetbagger
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_and_political_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_liberties
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colfax_massacre
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compromise_of_1877
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate_States_of_America
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_the_Rights_of_Man_and_of_the_Citizen
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disenfranchisement_after_the_Reconstruction_Era
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Wilder
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drapetomania
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enforcement_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Foner
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedman
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedmen%27s_Bureau
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedmen%27s_Bureau_bills
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_Slave_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_slave_clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_slaves_in_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_crimes_and_misdemeanors
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Democratic_Party
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Republican_Party
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impeachment_of_Andrew_Johnson
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incorporation_of_the_Bill_of_Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individual_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ku_Klux_Klan
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_African-American_officeholders_during_Reconstruction
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manumission
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NAACP_v._Alabama
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_and_legal_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinckney_B._S._Pinchback
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_Republicans
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Amendments
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_era
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redeemers
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_Underground_Railroad
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sankofa
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalawag
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secession
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separate_but_equal
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharecropping
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharecropping#United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slaughter-House_Cases
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_catcher
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_codes
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_patrol
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_power
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Field_Orders_No._15
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States%27_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suffrage
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_percent_plan
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenure_of_Office_Act_(1867)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thaddeus_Stevens
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-fifths_clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_Railroad
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_suffrage
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Civil_War
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wade%E2%80%93Davis_Bill
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_supremacy
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tecumseh_Sherman

 

 

 

BLACKGIRLMAGIC

 

 

Resource & Article

 

  1. "You Got the Wrong Black Girl on the Right Day, Baby: Montana Woman Kicks Police Out of Her House; Black Twitter Rejoices." Aliya Semper Ewing, Theroot.com. May 05, 2019. Knowledge is power, and clearly, Angela Whitehead of Billings, Montana has plenty of both. Ms. Whitehead was minding her business in her own home, doing whatever it is she felt like, because it’s the privacy of her own home and she’s entitled to peace of mind and security. But when cops barged into her home through an open door, without warrant, and tried to make her business their business, they weren’t prepared for the wrath of Educated Black Womanhood. https://www.theroot.com/you-got-the-wrong-black-girl-on-the-right-day-baby-mo-1834537515

 

 

Multimedia

 

NSFW (depending where you work) for language and TRUTH TO POWER.

 

  1. How the police started some ish with Sis: https://twitter.com/tyrone345345/status/1124037056110432258
  2. How Sis finished some ish with the police: https://twitter.com/tyrone345345/status/1123729697265864706

 

 

 

SANKOFA

 

 

Resources & Articles

 

 

  1. Sankofa is a word in the Twi language of Ghana that translates to "Go back and get it" (san - to return; ko - to go; fa - to fetch, to seek and take) and also refers to the Asante Adinkra symbol represented either with a stylized heart shape or by a bird with its head turned backwards while its feet face forward carrying a precious egg in its mouth. Sankofa is often associated with the proverb, “Se wo were fi na wosankofa a yenkyi," which translates as: "It is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sankofa
  2. Founded by Harry Belafonte, Sankofa.org educates, motivates, and activates artists and allies in service of grassroots movements and equitable change. THE MEANING OF SANKOFA: You must reach back to reclaim that which is lost in order to move forward The “Sankofa” is a metaphorical symbol used by the Akan people of Ghana, generally depicted as a bird with its head turned backward taking an egg from its back. It expresses the importance of reaching back to knowledge gained in the past and bringing it into the present in order to make positive progress. https://www.sankofa.org/mission

 

 

Multimedia

 

  1. "How to pronounce the word "Twi" ? - Learn Twi with Efia Sheila #3." Efia Sheila's Journey, Youtube. December 14, 2018. [2:20] In this video, I will teach you how to pronounce the word "Twi". So you can impress your Ghanaian friends by showing them that you can pronounce the name of their language correctly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnnHQTytGHE

 

 

 

~#~

 

Sources for Meta on the Meta: "THIS MUCH, I Know is True"

 

Multimedia

 

 

  1. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Slave Patrols-The Father Of Modern Day Police." Africa Diaspora News Channel, Youtube. August 7, 2016. [14:30] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRDUok20B6k [Worth it, also, for the comments-section.--beetle]
  2. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "How to pronounce the word "Twi" ? - Learn Twi with Efia Sheila #3." Efia Sheila's Journey, Youtube. December 14, 2018. [2:20] In this video, I will teach you how to pronounce the word "Twi". So you can impress your Ghanaian friends by showing them that you can pronounce the name of their language correctly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnnHQTytGHE
  3. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Reconstruction and 1876: Crash Course US History #22." CrashCourse, Youtube. July 18, 2013. [12:59] In which John Green teaches you about Reconstruction. After the divisive, destructive Civil War, Abraham Lincoln had a plan to reconcile the country and make it whole again. Then he got shot, Andrew Johnson took over, and the disagreements between Johnson and Congress ensured that Reconstruction would fail. The election of 1876 made the whole thing even more of a mess, and the country called it off, leaving the nation still very divided. John will talk about the gains made by African-Americans in the years after the Civil War, and how they lost those gains almost immediately when Reconstruction stopped. You'll learn about the Freedman's Bureau, the 14th and 15th amendments, and the disastrous election of 1876. John will explore the goals of Reconstruction, the successes and ultimate failure, and why his alma mater Kenyon College is better than Raoul's alma mater NYU. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nowsS7pMApI
  4. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23." CrashCourse, Youtube. July 17, 2015. [7:55] Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. https://youtu.be/kbwsF-A2sTg
  5. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29." CrashCourse, Youtube. August 29, 2015. [8:15] Today, Craig is going to talk about the most important part of the Constitution - the Fourteenth Amendment. In particular, we're going to discuss the "equal protection" clause and how it relates to our civil rights. So we've spent the last few episodes talking about civil liberties , or our protections from the government, but civil rights are different as they involve how some groups of citizens are able to treat other groups (usually minorities) under existing laws. We'll talk about the process the Supreme Court follows in equal protection cases, called strict scrutiny, and look at one landmark case, Brown v Board of Education, and explain its role in starting the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. https://youtu.be/qKK5KVI9_Q8 
Resources & Articles

 

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/40_Acres_%26_A_Mule
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abolitionism
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Johnson
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Four_of_the_United_States_Constitution#Clause_3:_Fugitive_Slave_Clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Two_of_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_impeachment
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Codes_(United_States)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_Democrats
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpetbagger
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_and_political_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_liberties
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colfax_massacre
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compromise_of_1877
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate_States_of_America
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_the_Rights_of_Man_and_of_the_Citizen
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disenfranchisement_after_the_Reconstruction_Era
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Wilder
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drapetomania
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enforcement_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Foner
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedman
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedmen%27s_Bureau
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedmen%27s_Bureau_bills
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_Slave_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_slave_clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_slaves_in_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_crimes_and_misdemeanors
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Democratic_Party
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Republican_Party
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impeachment_of_Andrew_Johnson
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individual_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ku_Klux_Klan
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_African-American_officeholders_during_Reconstruction
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manumission
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_and_legal_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinckney_B._S._Pinchback
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_Republicans
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Amendments
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_era
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redeemers
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_Underground_Railroad
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sankofa
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalawag
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secession
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separate_but_equal
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharecropping
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharecropping#United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slaughter-House_Cases
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_catcher
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_codes
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_patrol
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_power
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Field_Orders_No._15
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States%27_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suffrage
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_percent_plan
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenure_of_Office_Act_(1867)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thaddeus_Stevens
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-fifths_clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_Railroad
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_suffrage
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Civil_War
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wade%E2%80%93Davis_Bill
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_supremacy
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tecumseh_Sherman

 

 

 

Sources for Black X-Files: ""

 

 

Multimedia

 

 

  1. "Jesse Williams Full Speech at BET Awards 2016." Aaron Cadam Samuels, Youtube. July 4, 2016. [8:17] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbXmnUILMp0
  2. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Slave Patrols-The Father Of Modern Day Police." Africa Diaspora News Channel, Youtube. August 7, 2016. [14:30] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRDUok20B6k [Worth it, also, for the comments-section.--beetle]
  3. [Unaired during this segment but used as reference and source] "Reconstruction and 1876: Crash Course US History #22." CrashCourse, Youtube. July 18, 2013. [12:59] In which John Green teaches you about Reconstruction. After the divisive, destructive Civil War, Abraham Lincoln had a plan to reconcile the country and make it whole again. Then he got shot, Andrew Johnson took over, and the disagreements between Johnson and Congress ensured that Reconstruction would fail. The election of 1876 made the whole thing even more of a mess, and the country called it off, leaving the nation still very divided. John will talk about the gains made by African-Americans in the years after the Civil War, and how they lost those gains almost immediately when Reconstruction stopped. You'll learn about the Freedman's Bureau, the 14th and 15th amendments, and the disastrous election of 1876. John will explore the goals of Reconstruction, the successes and ultimate failure, and why his alma mater Kenyon College is better than Raoul's alma mater NYU. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nowsS7pMApI
  4. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23." CrashCourse, Youtube. July 17, 2015. [7:55] Today, Craig is going to give you an overview of civil rights and civil liberties. Often these terms are used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Our civil liberties, contained in the Bill of Rights, once only protected us from the federal government, but slowly these liberties have been incorporated to protect us from the states. We’ll take a look at how this has happened and the supreme court cases that got us here. https://youtu.be/kbwsF-A2sTg
  5. [Unaired but used as reference and source] "Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29." CrashCourse, Youtube. August 29, 2015. [8:15] Today, Craig is going to talk about the most important part of the Constitution - the Fourteenth Amendment. In particular, we're going to discuss the "equal protection" clause and how it relates to our civil rights. So we've spent the last few episodes talking about civil liberties , or our protections from the government, but civil rights are different as they involve how some groups of citizens are able to treat other groups (usually minorities) under existing laws. We'll talk about the process the Supreme Court follows in equal protection cases, called strict scrutiny, and look at one landmark case, Brown v Board of Education, and explain its role in starting the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. https://youtu.be/qKK5KVI9_Q8 

 

 

 

Resources & Articles

 

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/40_Acres_%26_A_Mule
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_Four_of_the_United_States_Constitution#Clause_3:_Fugitive_Slave_Clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Codes_(United_States)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_and_political_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_liberties
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colfax_massacre
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compromise_of_1877
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederate_States_of_America
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_the_Rights_of_Man_and_of_the_Citizen
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disenfranchisement_after_the_Reconstruction_Era
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drapetomania
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enforcement_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Foner
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedman
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedmen%27s_Bureau
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedmen%27s_Bureau_bills
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_Slave_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_slave_clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_slaves_in_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Democratic_Party
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Republican_Party
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individual_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_and_legal_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_Republicans
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Acts
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_Amendments
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reconstruction_era
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sankofa
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separate_but_equal
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_catcher
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_codes
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_patrol
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_power
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Field_Orders_No._15
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States%27_rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-fifths_clause
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Constitution
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_suffrage
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_supremacy

 

 

 


Music Playlists
First Hour Music and Playlists:
  1. ABBA: "Money, Money, Money"
  2. Neneh Cherry: "Buffalo Stance"

 

 


Second Hour Music and Playlists:

 

 

  1. Kirk Franklin: "Revolution"
  2. Ibeyi, featuring Kamasi Washington: "Deathless"
  3. The O'Jays: "For the Love of Money"
  4. Arctic Monkeys: "I Want it All"